opendatastudy

Research on Open Data and Transparency

The Scottish Information Commissioner’s Intervention: skulduggery in Scotland?

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Today the Scottish Information Commissioner published his report into claims that the Scottish government had been making certain FOI requesters (namely journalists and political researchers) subject to different procedures. This followed claims from Scottish journalists in 2017 of interference in their FOI requests. Here’s a few conclusions from the report…

Were journalists dealt with differently?

The SIC concludes they were.

‘While I received reassurances throughout my interviews that journalists’ requests were dealt with in the same way as requests from any other person, this is clearly not the case.

Journalists, together with MSPs and political researchers, are expressly made subject to a different process for clearance than other requester groups. As set out above, their requests are almost invariably subjected to an additional layer of clearance which is likely to delay the consideration of the case. This process is applied because of who/what they are, not what they asked for. This is far from the applicant-blind principle of freedom of information legislation’.p.24

‘It may very well be the case that many requests for information from journalists, MSPs and political researchers are for sensitive information, in which case it may be entirely justified that clearance is required at a higher level in the organisation. However, by creating and applying a process based on requester type rather than the nature of the request, not only is the spirit of FOI legislation offended, but trust between those groups mentioned in the policy and the Scottish Government may also be damaged. I have heard criticisms of a two-tier system, and the existing policy simply reinforces such concerns’. P.24

Did it affect disclosure?

There’s no evidence that the ‘two-tier’ approach changed disclosure.

‘Except for 2015/16, the statistics do not show journalists to be treated in a materially different way from other requester types, insofar as the likelihood of obtaining full or partial disclosure is concerned. However, given the level of involvement that special advisers have in the handling of many information requests, there is obviously a perception that their involvement is disadvantageous to such requests’.p.27

…But  it did delay journalistic FOIs, above the average amount of time taken…

‘Despite these significant improvements, there is still a noticeable difference in time taken to deal with media, as opposed to non-media, requests. While some of this may be due to the complexity of some of those requests, it is inevitable that higher levels of clearance will add time to any response process’. P.30

Was any there wrongdoing (Part 1 identity)?

The SIC concludes it contravened the ‘spirit’ of FOI

‘In my view, the practice of referring all media requests for clearance is contrary to the spirit of FOI legislation. In most cases, the identity of a requester should be irrelevant for the purposes of FOISA and an authority should handle requests on the basis that they are applicant, and purpose, blind’ P.30.

Was there wrongdoing (Part 2 use of exemptions)?

It seems not-though exemptions were ‘pushed’ to their limit or tried out.

‘I could find no evidence of improper motives in the application of exemptions… There was an indication in some cases of reliance on exemptions where, although there may have been a legally stateable basis for doing so, the prospects of success, were the case to be reviewed or appealed, were not high’…though he notes one ‘flimsy’ attempt. P.31

Was there wrongdoing (Part 3 records and a chilling)?

One recurrent theme of the report was that there was a lack of documents to either support or refute claims (and the IC recommends there be new rules on record keeping).

‘The clarity of the situation is not helped by the general lack of records of interactions between special advisers and case-handlers in the case files… The lack of a clear record of what was discussed only feeds speculation which a clear record could dispel.’ P.23

‘Looking at the advice provided to Ministers, as previously mentioned, records management in case files is sporadic and in many cases the rationale for the decision is not clear from the documents.’ P.32

‘The examination of Scottish Government case files revealed significant gaps in the information recorded. In many cases, there was scant information contained in case files; in some there was no documentation whatsoever…Consequently, in many cases examined by my officers it was impossible to ascertain what processes had been followed, what (if any) discussions had taken place, whether advice had been sought and/or received and who had been involved in shaping responses’.p.34

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